Tag Archives: social media

iDepression – Is There an App for That?

2 Jul

Increased social media use (specifically Facebook) is positively correlated with depression, stress, and anxiety. One study examined the Facebook behavior of nursing students and their emotional outlooks. According to this study, increased time spent on Facebook was positively correlated to high depression scores (Labrague, 2014).

Still another study found positive correlations between Facebook use and having negative feelings about one’s self-esteem (Lee, 2014). This study in particular show that people tend to compare oneself to others whose posts appear on their Facebook feeds. According to this study, social comparison theory is used to explain the study results; that comparing oneself to others can influence self-perception (Lee, 2014). On the other hand, the study also poses the theory that people with low self-esteem are predisposed to self-compare to others while using Facebook. I imagine that would make for a very frustrating self-fulfilling prophecy!

I think it probably works both ways. I believe that people with low self-esteem are more likely to self-compare, and that being on Facebook a lot leads to self-comparing, which leads to low self-esteem. The question is how much is too much, and with social media becoming so pervasive in our society, what kinds of implications does this carry for people, especially younger generations who have adopted these technologies as a natural aspect of their childhoods and adolescence?

Another of my own interpretations of these studies is the idea that Facebook time is not necessarily an addition to our social time – it’s becoming a substitute for it.

 

With decreased face-to-face time, we may naturally become less socially stimulated and socially content. Couple that with seeing lots of people doing fun stuff on your feed (people doing fun things – together – in person), and the self-comparing cycle that may lead to depression becomes as clear as it is troubling.

 

Works Cited:

Labrague, L. J. (2014). Facebook use and adolescents’ emotional states of depression, anxiety, and stress. Health Science Journal, 8(1), 80-89.

Lee, S. (2014). How do people compare themselves with others on social network sites?: The case of Facebook. Computers In Human Behavior, 32253-260. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2013.12.009

Park, S., Lee, S., Kwak, J., Cha, M., & Jeong, B. (2013). Activities on Facebook reveal the depressive state of users. Journal Of Medical Internet Research, 15(10), e217. doi:10.2196/jmir.2718

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Stop the World – I Want to Get Off

22 Jun

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Globalization is an increasingly complicated issue, especially as our world becomes “hyperconnected” by new forms of media and technology that we use ever more frequently and intimately (WLADAWSKY-BERGER, 2014). As such, there are a number of ways of looking at it. 

It’s one serious concern that as corporations become more multinational, social injustices are committed, especially in nations that have limited protections against the working poor. They are also becoming increasingly politically influential, which is a threat to democratic societies (Collins, 2010). 

A convincing argument points that “during the most recent period of rapid growth in global trade and investment, inequality worsened” throughout the world (Collins, 2010). Meanwhile, the “economic ramifications” of a globalizing world threaten the budgets for safety nets to assist the most vulnerable people in the population (Collins, 2010). 

Of course, globalization also brings economic growth to developing countries, and may also contribute to spreading democracy (Collins, 2010). The spread of knowledge amongst societies contributes to a more enlightened world, with a more politically and civically engaged population (WLADAWSKY-BERGER, 2014). This may also spread tolerance and awareness, which may promote compassion and good neighborliness. 

Based on a Harvard poll of 18 – 24 year olds, the highest percentage of participants neither strongly oppose nor strongly favor globalization (Dolliver, 2007). I imagine this is because for this generation, globalization is merely a way of life, and it’s all we have ever known. 

I was watching the TV show “Frasier” recently, and was struck how when the characters get coffee in a cafe, everyone around them is having coffee, talking, reading a magazine, or a book. Nowadays everyone has their earbuds in, tapping away at their iPads or phones. Frasier wasn’t filmed that long ago – and globalization, by nature, is an increasingly rapid process. How have we become so insular in the face of being also, paradoxically, so hyperconnected? 

One thing is for certain – it’s a freight train, and nothing will stop it. It may also be a dangerously speeding freight train – but isn’t that how industry improves? By investigating its accidents and disasters to make changes along the way? Somebody call the NTSB!

One thing I fear about how globalization affects us all is that we don’t really contemplate its effects. People seem to want to naturally believe that we are our own social agents, and that we make choices in a vaccuum. That’s an ignorant perspective, and maybe the consequences of globalization will help us all realize that we are all products of the world we inhabit – one that is changing extremely fast. 

 

 

Collins, M. (2010, January 1). The Pros And Cons Of Globalization. Manufacturing . net. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from http://www.manufacturing.net/articles/2010/06/the-pros-and-cons-of-globalization

Dolliver, M. (2007). The Pros and Cons Of Globalization. Adweek,48(17), 26.

WLADAWSKY-BERGER, I. (2014, January 1). The Changing Nature of Globalization in Our Hyperconnected, Knowledge-Intensive Economy. The CIO Report RSS. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2014/06/20/the-changing-nature-of-globalization-in-our-hyperconnected-knowledge-intensive-economy/

Happy 102nd International Women’s Day! ♀♡

8 Mar

Celebrate! Yay! We’ve come so far, nationally and globally. But there is much to be done. Patriarchy is the law of the land, and women and girls suffer infinitely because of it.

But there is hope. Not only are we close to achieving certain #MDGS (Millennium Development Goals), but organizations around the world are identifying obstacles, appropriating resources, and implementing solutions.

The best part of International Women’s Day is that warm, fuzzy feeling, when all your year-round hard work amongst advocates everywhere is highlighted in a mainstream way, and you see the results of such work: real change. But a lot of the coverage I have seen lately is on solidarity, momentum, consciousness-raising, and awareness. All of those are all well and good, and indeed, the foundation of change itself. But as we all know, caring is not enough. Not even if everyone cared.

Left to right: Christy Turlington-Burns, Stella Mukasa, (Director of Gender Violence and Rights at ICRW), Sarah Degnan Kambou (ICRW President), Andrea Mitchell (NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent), Michael Elliott, (President of the ONE Campaign), and Ravi Verma (ICRW Asia Director)

Left to right: Christy Turlington-Burns, Stella Mukasa, (Director of Gender Violence and Rights at ICRW), Sarah Degnan Kambou (ICRW President), Andrea Mitchell (NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent), Michael Elliott, (President of the ONE Campaign), and Ravi Verma (ICRW Asia Director)

Our bleeding hearts may break together, but even our collective, synchronized heartbeats won’t deafen reality: we must do more, while simultaneously keeping our voices aimed at raising the profile of the issue. We must work on the issue from all angles, simultaneously, in tandem with one another. Balancing this is hard work.

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