Tag Archives: economic development

Stop the World – I Want to Get Off

22 Jun

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Globalization is an increasingly complicated issue, especially as our world becomes “hyperconnected” by new forms of media and technology that we use ever more frequently and intimately (WLADAWSKY-BERGER, 2014). As such, there are a number of ways of looking at it. 

It’s one serious concern that as corporations become more multinational, social injustices are committed, especially in nations that have limited protections against the working poor. They are also becoming increasingly politically influential, which is a threat to democratic societies (Collins, 2010). 

A convincing argument points that “during the most recent period of rapid growth in global trade and investment, inequality worsened” throughout the world (Collins, 2010). Meanwhile, the “economic ramifications” of a globalizing world threaten the budgets for safety nets to assist the most vulnerable people in the population (Collins, 2010). 

Of course, globalization also brings economic growth to developing countries, and may also contribute to spreading democracy (Collins, 2010). The spread of knowledge amongst societies contributes to a more enlightened world, with a more politically and civically engaged population (WLADAWSKY-BERGER, 2014). This may also spread tolerance and awareness, which may promote compassion and good neighborliness. 

Based on a Harvard poll of 18 – 24 year olds, the highest percentage of participants neither strongly oppose nor strongly favor globalization (Dolliver, 2007). I imagine this is because for this generation, globalization is merely a way of life, and it’s all we have ever known. 

I was watching the TV show “Frasier” recently, and was struck how when the characters get coffee in a cafe, everyone around them is having coffee, talking, reading a magazine, or a book. Nowadays everyone has their earbuds in, tapping away at their iPads or phones. Frasier wasn’t filmed that long ago – and globalization, by nature, is an increasingly rapid process. How have we become so insular in the face of being also, paradoxically, so hyperconnected? 

One thing is for certain – it’s a freight train, and nothing will stop it. It may also be a dangerously speeding freight train – but isn’t that how industry improves? By investigating its accidents and disasters to make changes along the way? Somebody call the NTSB!

One thing I fear about how globalization affects us all is that we don’t really contemplate its effects. People seem to want to naturally believe that we are our own social agents, and that we make choices in a vaccuum. That’s an ignorant perspective, and maybe the consequences of globalization will help us all realize that we are all products of the world we inhabit – one that is changing extremely fast. 

 

 

Collins, M. (2010, January 1). The Pros And Cons Of Globalization. Manufacturing . net. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from http://www.manufacturing.net/articles/2010/06/the-pros-and-cons-of-globalization

Dolliver, M. (2007). The Pros and Cons Of Globalization. Adweek,48(17), 26.

WLADAWSKY-BERGER, I. (2014, January 1). The Changing Nature of Globalization in Our Hyperconnected, Knowledge-Intensive Economy. The CIO Report RSS. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2014/06/20/the-changing-nature-of-globalization-in-our-hyperconnected-knowledge-intensive-economy/

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