This is What Happened When I Decided to Follow My Dreams

12 Apr

This is What Happened When I Decided to Follow My Dreams

It’s a common phenomenon. You’re sitting there, in your computer chair, balancing a bowl of cereal on your winter-flabbed-out stomach – when it hits you. You have to sell all your belongings, and backpack across the Himalaya to find your true calling.

Surprise

Don’t rain on her parade.

When you get your bearings, you’ve hopefully only spilled your cereal, and not woken up in a Nepalese hospital wondering how you got there.

Well folks, life is a journey – and we should all enjoy the ride. But when inspiration strikes, we dare not ignore it lest we risk having a moment such as the one above, when our dreams and desires explode full force, and we get crazy ideas we can no longer ignore.

Ladies and gentlemen, I’ve launched a women-focused consulting firm startup. This is my calling, and I am excited to introduce Phoenix Consulting.

From the brand-spankin’ new website:

Phoenix Consulting, led by CEO Evin Phoenix, is a women-focused advisement and facilitation startup, built on the desire to increase women’s leadership. Phoenix Consulting lends itself toward community-based outreach to engage the public, corporations, and individuals on the importance of women leaders, and on the challenges to our success. Other consulting services include private professional counseling, corporate presentations, speaking engagements, and more. 

So if you’re looking for some good ideas on navigating your workplace, or need some custom advice, reach out. Free phone consultations up to one hour! Check it out and spread the word – because achieving our dreams is impossible as a rogue agent. Let’s work together to Fly Like a Phoenix.

flylikeaphoenix.com

Force of Nature: Beyonce as a Feminist BEAST

17 Dec

You may have heard that Beyonce mysteriously dropped an iTunes-only album, complete with artsy, dreamscape music videos accompanying EVERY song. It’s at its worst an egotistical experiment, but I imagine that’s the nature of every daring artistic endeavor. At its best, this album is a feminist musical revolution. Some have argued over the concept of Beyonce being a feminist, but this album is a deep exploration of her maternal instincts as her social consciousness has been raised by having a female black child in America. Clearly, this has forever changed her, and she presents a deeply developed cultural and spiritual perspective through a gendered lens.

Image

Perhaps most importantly, this is her guerilla musical endeavor. She has broken rule and convention, and gone against every music label and institutional convention. That’s radical; that’s powerful. Her forceful push through these barriers could help usher in a new era of musical creation and changes in the institutions that have hindered musical brilliance. She’s owning her incredible power as a force of nature, from every possible perspective. As a black woman, she is reclaiming each and every particle of agency that is traditionally taken from women of color, especially as entertainers. That’s fucking BADass.

The controversy of Beyonce’s right to claim herself a feminist stems from the pettiness that grounds every social movement, least of all women’s rights. So she dyes her natural African American hair blonde and uses her sexuality as an entertainer. Well, that’s her choice and prerogative. It’s even more profound given that women of color in music and pop culture are often the most sexually objectified without consultation.

But before you might criticize her for claiming feminist agency, check yourself. Look in the mirror. I don’t just call myself a feminist – I AM a feminist. But yes, I shave my arms and underarms, wear makeup, high heels to work, and fake eyelashes for photo shoots. Why? Because I’ve been socialized to carry some shame otherwise. Just like her – though even more so because as a woman of color she enjoys even less privilege than I do. I imagine that you and every other feminist has some contradictions as well. But that’s what makes us human – and our fight to exist merely as human is exactly what defines us as feminists.

This album is at once high feminist art, even musical haute couture, and it is obviously ignited and inspired by her motherhood. But furthermore, she is deconstructing her own flaws, contradictions, and humanity. Thats’s the ultimate artistic endeavor – to bare one’s soul as we simply exist – as imperfect, simple, complex, confused, enduring human beings. Through soundscapes that evoke a glimpse of the music of tomorrow, Beyonce explores her existential demons as she exists- as just another human. That is the ultimate feminist statement.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/beyonce/id780330041

A Haunting of the Soul: Folk Music and the Inside Llewyn Davis Soundtrack

11 Dec

Jiulliard-trained Oscar Isaac, while breathtaking in his multi-layered performances onscreen and behind the microphone, lacks a well-worn vocality. A resonant gritty edge gleaned only from walking the dusty road of the American narrative described in story-song in every folk ballad ever written. Where his classical-trained execution ends, however, begins the timeless echo of the powerful musical voices of Bob Dylan and Dave Van Ronk, two similar artists on whom the movie is loosely based, but who enjoyed vastly different artistic outcomes.

The Coen Brothers’ adaptation of music-to-film (or film-to-music?) finds its calling here. Here, among the deep wooden sustain of notes plucked on vintage instruments, which evoke the cigarette-smoke-filled cavern of the Gaslight Cafe. Greenwich Village’s pre-cool, pre-beatnik haunt serves as the backdrop of musical history making in the chronicle of folk music in both the semi-fictitious tale told in the film, and in the real account of the 50s and 60s folk scene.

Some criticize folk in its simplicity. It’s not uncommon to find songs comprised of three chords or less, with monotonous melodies that refrain for centuries. But it’s important to note that often the technical aspect of music itself can certainly both be the story itself, or it can easily get in the way of the story. The songwriter’s challenge is to find the balance. And if folk is in fact “the people’s music,” then it should in no way mimic the classist attitudes and systems that separate us as a society. Notes composed in an ivory tower have often served this purpose through the ages, but folk is the musical journey of every cultural movement that invoked struggle to survive. Indeed, classical training in music theory has for millennia been a hallmark of the aristocracy. Conversely, the musical traditions of history’s poorest are reflected in the untechnical and unclassical songs of the ages, less compositions and more human experience. This is its ruggedness, a grit that serves the ages in its raw truth. Folk music is at its most precious and sacred when it inhabits this quality. Though for many musicians, this is a characteristic that is all too easy to forget.

Everybody knows that folk pre-dated rock, but few realize it pre-dates even jazz. Blues may be a direct cousin of folk music, but folk came before it all. Indeed, American folk is a vestige of the folk musical tradition that grew from the foggy hillsides of the Celts, as well as the trampled mudbath streets of Medieval cities, as well as the colorful landscape of every country in every continent. The nueva cancion movement of Latin America, the creole music of the Caribbean, the silver thumb-pianos of Africa, and the multi-stringed instruments of the Indian subcontinent. Folk is essentially a term for the music of every cultural tradition throughout history.

To most people, these names come to mind at the thought of “folk music,” Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Woodie Guthrie, etc. SOJA lead singer/guitarist Jacob Hemphill, however, has a different perspective. “To me, Rage Against The Machine, Wu -Tang Clan, Sade, Johnny Cash, Bob Marley – they’re all folk artists,” he says. “There’s no difference between Raekwon saying, ‘I grew up on the crime side, the New York Times side, where staying alive was no jive,’ to Bob Marley saying, ‘Cold ground was my bed last night and rock was my pillow, too,’ to Johnny Cash saying, ‘I know I had it coming, I know I can’t be free, but those people keep on moving (around) and that’s what tortures me.’ Folk is all about storytelling and passing on a legacy. It’s timeless, it’s limitless and it crosses all boundaries.”

With that in mind, the musical boundaries that contain “folk” conceptually begin to broaden widely. Personally, I make the argument that folk encompasses all music that tells allegorical cultural stories. Whether it be Johnny Cash as the Man in Black, who was the voice of the children of the Great Depression, or strolling troubadours from generations ago who tell oral histories in song – or even myself, as I emphatically focus on storytelling in musical form. Any and every singer-songwriter composes in the folk tradition, vast and ancient as it may be. That is the deep richness of folk; it is an inclusive circle of the human voice, with roots buried beneath every hallowed musical tradition, that continues to freely weave parallel and dynamic voices of the human experience.

For a sampler of some of the most revered and notable folk songs in the American narrative, please see the Smithsonian’s Anthology of American Folk Music, curated by the people.

Below is my favorite American folk song since I was a little girl. My mother used to sing it to me, and her father used to sing it to her, and his mother sang it to him, and so on. Sung by the incomparable Judy Garland, a daughter of the vaudeville tradition. Her rendition encapsulates the power of folk: the haunting of the soul.

New songs :: Hard acoustic rock!

2 Nov

I just added two brand-spankin’ new originals! One’s a funky groove and one’s a grungy heavy rock ballad!

Much love! Please like & share <3

Dia de los Muertos

25 Oct

For the uninitiated, this holiday may be a complete mystery. For the traditionalists, it is perhaps the most sacred. The day of the dead is a Mexican holiday that, as many Mexican spiritual traditions, has found cult-like status in the cultural diaspora, as we Chicanos continue to spread across the Americas and world.

I drew this two years ago for the occasion

I drew this two years ago for the occasion

Mexico is certainly a culture that is obsessed with the juxtaposition of life unto death and love unto pain. Suffering is as common of a theme in Mexican folklore, music, and art, as is the reverence of the divine. Some have criticized it as a cult of death, but it is quite the opposite. It is a culture that relentlessly worships the profound nature of living, as opposed to hiding from its impermanence.

As a Latina and a Mexican folklorist-hobbyist, I am pleased to present the above ofrenda as well as my own recorded version of the classic epic folk song, La Llorona.

 

For more on el Dia de los Muertos, please visit: http://latino.si.edu/education/LVMDayoftheDeadFestival.htm

Video

La Llorona :: Mexican Folk Song

7 Oct

guitars/ vocals by Evin Maria Ximena Phoenix
photography by jamie rasmussen
::Traditional Mexican folk song::

La Llorona is a song I’ve grown up loving.. Not just loving, but singing with my guts and grit. A Mexican folk song, it carries with it deep traditions of the music and culture of Mexico, and the general spirit of “la puebla.” A song of death, dying, despair, and loneliness, it is a chronicle of the most epic of ballads. Truly a woman’s allegory, this song epitomizes the voice of “la llorona,” or, the weeping woman.

This song is close to my heart and deeply influenced my style as a performer and songwriter. I hope you enjoy my interpretation of this iconic piece, and I hope I do justice to its roots and pay homage to La Chavela.

From wikipedia:
It is difficult to pinpoint exactly who was the first to compose the song “La Llorona”, since it stems from the hundred-year-old urban legend. However, the song was first made well-known to contemporary audiences in 1993 by the Costa Rican-born singer Chavela Vargas. The song’s name and inspiration comes from the urban legend of La Llorona popular in North and South America. The story is of a woman said to haunt the valleys of Mexico, weeping for her children whom she drowned in a fit of madness. There are many versions to the story, but all are a variation of certain details. In one version, a woman drowns her kids because the man she had been seeing wanted to break things off with her. He did not want someone who already had a family. After he finds out about that she killed her children, however, the man leaves her indefinitely and she then commits suicide.

Lyrics translated into English:
Everyone calls me the black one, Llorona
Black but loving
Everyone calls me the black one, Llorona
Black but loving
I am like the green chile, Llorona
Spicy but tasty
I am like the green chile, Llorona
Spicy but tasty

There in my weeping, weeping you’re my girl
There in my weeping, weeping you’re my girl

I removed the crybaby loving you, but never forget
I removed the crybaby loving you, but never forget

Alas, Llorona Llorona,
Llorona, take me to the river
Cover me with your shawl, Llorona
Because I’m dying of cold

Yes, because I love you, Llorona
Love you, want more
If you’ve already given your life, Llorona
What more do you want?
Do you want more?

Although the story lines differ when comparing the song and the legend, both integrate common themes such as loneliness and despair. One popular interpretation of the song is of the singer feeling trapped by this woman (La Llorona) who has fallen in love with him. If he even thinks about leaving her, she weeps. He tries everything in his power to leave her, but he is trapped by the woman’s twisted mind games. He wishes to be taken down to the river to be drowned, and so then his suffering can finally end. The suffering that the man goes through from being trapped in a relationship with a woman in a way parallels the suffering that the woman in the legend goes through from having her lover leave her.

Video

My first single! :: The Mermaid’s Fire :: Official Lyric Video

17 Sep

Please share & enjoy! From the forthcoming ‘Songs From the Promised Land’ © Evin Maria Ximena Phoenix

This is a song about coming home.

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